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Soli II

CN D - Centre national de la danse 2006 - Director : Centre national de la danse, Réalisation

Choreographer(s) : Égéa, Anthony (France)

Present in collection(s): CN D - Spectacles et performances

Video producer : Centre national de la danse

Integral video available at CND de Pantin

en fr

Soli II

CN D - Centre national de la danse 2006 - Director : Centre national de la danse, Réalisation

Choreographer(s) : Égéa, Anthony (France)

Present in collection(s): CN D - Spectacles et performances

Video producer : Centre national de la danse

Integral video available at CND de Pantin

en fr

Soli II

First presented in June 2006 at the CND as part of the HipHop Tanz Dance Festival, ever since this original solo has never ceased to be a resounding success. The CND gives you the opportunity to see it again for its one hundredth performance.

Choreographed by Anthony Égéa from the company Rêvolution for the dancer Émilie Sudre, Soli II achieves its aim: wielding all the feminine stereotypes to finally exhaust them in the blunt virtuosity of the physical challenge. The intelligence of the hip-hop body dressed in stiletto heels and a black mini dress - an apparel just the opposite to the specific sportswear look of the acrobatic break dance style - , dazzling with warrior beauty [...] No easy seduction in this solo driven by the music of Tedd Zahmal. A perceptible inner harshness makes the dancer invulnerable, untouchable. Her skirt can rise up completely as she somersaults, she can even end up in the wings ... Émilie Sudre, dressed only in a black petticoat and knee-pads, remains simple and proud. Her nudity, whatever the position, never eclipses the dance and its quality of writing, which shield her like invisible armour.

Rosita Boisseau, Le Monde, February 1st, 2007.

“To the sound of stiletto heels – those who have seen the film “The man who loved women”, will understand – even before the shapely silhouette, backlighted, the scene is set. A stereotype of femininity, Émilie Sudre has come to show what she’s made of. A bullfighter’s walk around the white carpet, her back arched, challenging the public with her stare. Incidentally, you need to imagine that room full, like an arena, of frantic hip-hoppers come to witness the sight of virtuosos giving combat… and the sheer confidence that Émilie needs to be just there. She suddenly leaps onto the rectangle, like a tatami, and carries out hip-hop variations, one after the other, with a slowness that displays masterly skills. From the top of her stilettos, street gestures turn into a calligraphy, a blue-print for a tightrope walker. Better still, she takes off a shoe... Easy to imagine that this display of virtuosity silenced many a whiff of male chauvinism. Such was the aim.

Her arms caught up in her figure-hugging dress, she’s now a veiled woman in an oriental-style. And the hip-hop gestures in this apparel clearly point to an emancipation. Then she’s there, turning her back, half naked. She continues to dance, with sweet modesty, concealing her breasts as much as the dance permits. The scene is of rare beauty, but the demonstration has been made and there’s not much else to say about it. And that’s how it ends.

Soli 2 is the middle part of a triptych that Anthony Égéa has dedicated to challenging hip-hop stereotypes. Now self-standing, Émilie Sudre’s demonstration is an attack on the sexism frequently denounced in this milieu. However, the sheer intensity of the interpreter and the way she dominates her public, evocative of bullfighting, far exceed the initial goal. This solo is also the expression of the Woman using her attractiveness as a weapon and her seductiveness as a power. If, at times, this makes you think of Almodovar’s film Matador, this also explains why – and the solo passage is all the more important for this – in some cultures from which certain members of the hip-hop culture hail, women are constrained, humiliated and veiled”.

Philippe Verrièle, July 2007

Égéa, Anthony

Starting in 1984, Anthony Egéa embarked upon the long learning process of hip hop dance. Having gained awareness of numerous different techniques, he perfected his training at the Ecole Supérieure Rosella Hightower in Cannes thanks to a choreography scholarship from the French Ministry of Culture. He was also awarded the Lavoisier scholarship by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and trained at the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater in New York.
His work on the subject led naturally to a streamlining of his movement and the construction of more abstract forms, confronting the virtuoso with the miniscule, the demonstrative and the expressive.
His work arose from the context of an incensed humanity and the hip hop dance rebellion.
Since 1999, his choreographies have caused his style to evolve, bringing his own vocabulary into contact with other languages. Anthony Egéa has a desire to “reveal dance from the inside, deeper down, from our skin to our feelings”. He chooses paths for transformation over the course of his pieces and projects, to call movement into question by developing hybrid forms that distance themselves from conventions and expectations. From solos to group pieces, his work changes according to the people he meets.        
Anthony Egéa places the body at the centre of his work, developing the energy and expressiveness of gestures, with creations like Tryptik (2000), Amazones (2003), and Soli (2005), where hip hop is revisited in a feminine way. In Urban Ballet (2008), the relationship between music and dance presented him with another objective: to mix urban dance with a classical score. This piece also received a Labanotation. With Clash (2009), two dancers engage in a bodily debate that challenges the notion of power, territory and borders. 
In 2010 he wrote Tetris for the Ballet de l'Opéra National de Bordeaux and Middle, in 2011, for the Beijing Dance Theater.   
In 2012, he choreographed Rage, a piece for six African dancers, offering a tracking shot of the contemporary Africa that so fascinates him. In it, he shows the vital rebellion, ardour and artistic hunger of dancers who offer, through their startling presence, a perspective of their continent.
In 2013, he embarked upon a new adventure, drawing inspiration from the world of the Wizard of Oz to develop a new piece aimed at a younger audience. This new reading of Oz led him towards new horizons where fairy tales, hip hop, gestural virtuosity and video collide.   
Keen to pursue collaborations with dancers from other places, he joined up with the project Käfïg Brasil, a piece for eleven Brazilian dancers by Mourad Merzouki, to write one of its scenes.
Since 2002, in parallel to his artistic work, he has directed the Centre de Formation Professionnelle (Professional Training Centre) for hip hop dancers from the Rêvolution company.

 

Centre national de la danse, Réalisation

Since 2001, the National Center for Dance (CND) has been making recordings of its shows and educational programming and has created resources from these filmed performances (interviews, danced conferences, meetings with artists, demonstrations, major lessons, symposia specialized, thematic arrangements, etc.).

Soli II

Artistic direction / Conception : Anthony ÉGÉA

Choreography : Anthony ÉGÉA

Interpretation : Émilie SUDRE


Original music : Tedd ZAHMAL

Lights : Florent BLANCHON

Production / Coproduction of the video work : Enregistré au CND à Pantin le 23 juin 2006 dans le cadre du festival Danse HipHop Tanz

Duration : 20 minutes

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