Skip to main content
Add video to a playlist

Title

Choreographer

The description is limited to to a length of 500 characters


Your playlists

The video has been added successfully.

The video is already in this playlist.

You must be a member to enjoy all functionalities Login Register
You must be a member to view this playlist Login Register
Delete my video history Are you sure you want to delete the history?
Delete my search history Are you sure you want to delete the history?
Create a playlist The description is limited to to a length of 500 characters


Embed the video Embed the video on your website
Index
See the video
You can now make your playlists public! To do that, please visit your personnal account

Attention !
This video contains violence or nudity
Delete the playlist Are you sure you want to delete the playlist ?
Share this playlist
Configure access Keep your playlist private
(Only you can see it)
Make your playlist public
(and share it with the rest of users)
Configure access
Share Address Share by e-mail Send
Help By default, the search engine returns results for all founded words. For an advanced search, please use ":"
(eg: ":hiphop && breakdance")

You can use thoses operators :
AND (&&), OR (||), NOT, (! or -)

To use the NOT operator correctly, the second word needs to be written just after the exclamation mark, without space (e.g. ":merzouki !hip hop").


Documents
Information Your submission has been sent
Video information

Google Chrome Web Browser's video policy changed since version 66 : Video playlist can't be played automatically.

  • Add to playlists
  • Remove from your favorites Add to your favorites

Appalachian Spring

Numeridanse.tv
1958 - Director : Glushanok, Peter

Choreographer(s) : Graham, Martha (United States)

Present in collection(s): Numeridanse.tv

en fr

Appalachian Spring

Numeridanse.tv
1958 - Director : Glushanok, Peter

Choreographer(s) : Graham, Martha (United States)

Present in collection(s): Numeridanse.tv

en fr

Appalachian Spring

Appalachian Spring tells the story of a young frontier couple on their wedding day.  Created as the war in Europe was drawing to end, the ballet captured the imagination of Americans who were beginning to believe in a more prosperous future, a future in which men and women would be united again. Themes from American folk culture can be found throughout the dance. Aaron Copland weaves a Shaker tune, “Simple Gifts,” throughout his luminous score, while Martha Graham’s choreography includes square dance patterns, skips and paddle turns and curtsies, even a grand right and left.  The spare set by Isamu Noguchi features a Shaker rocking chair. With its tale of a new life in a new land, the dance embodies hope.  Critics called Appalachian Spring “shining and joyous,”  “a testimony to the simple fineness of the human spirit.”


Source: Martha Graham Dance Company

More information: www.marthagraham.org

Graham, Martha

Martha Graham’s creativity crossed artistic boundaries and embraced every artistic genre. She collaborated with and commissioned work from the leading visual artists, musicians, and designers of her day, including sculptor Isamu Noguchi and fashion designers Halston, Donna Karan, and Calvin Klein, as well as composers Aaron Copland, Samuel Barber, William Schuman, Norman Dello Joio, and Gian Carlo Menotti.

Influencing generations of choreographers and dancers including Merce Cunningham, Paul Taylor, and Twyla Tharp, Graham forever altered the scope of dance. Classical ballet dancers Margot Fonteyn, Rudolf Nureyev, and Mikhail Baryshnikov sought her out to broaden their artistry, and artists of all genres were eager to study and work with Graham—she taught actors including Bette Davis, Kirk Douglas, Madonna, Liza Minelli, Gregory Peck, Tony Randall, Eli Wallach, Anne Jackson, and Joanne Woodward to utilize their bodies as expressive instruments.

Graham’s groundbreaking style grew from her experimentation with the elemental movements of contraction and release. By focusing on the basic activities of the human form, she enlivened the body with raw, electric emotion. The sharp, angular, and direct movements of her technique were a dramatic departure from the predominant style of the time.

With an artistic practice deeply ingrained in the rhythm of American life and the struggles of the individual, Graham brought a distinctly American sensibility to every theme she explored. “A dance reveals the spirit of the country in which it takes root. No sooner does it fail to do this than it loses its integrity and significance,” she wrote in the 1937 essay A Platform for the American Dance.

Consistently infused with social, political, psychological, and sexual themes, Graham’s choreography is timeless, connecting with audiences past and present. Works such as Revolt (1927), Immigrant: Steerage, Strike (1928), and Chronicle (1936)—created the same year she turned down Hitler’s invitation to perform at the International Arts Festival organized in conjunction with the Olympic Games in Berlin—personify Graham’s commitment to addressing challenging contemporary issues and distinguish her as a conscientious and politically powerful artist.

Martha Graham remained a strong advocate of the individual throughout her career, creating works such as Deaths and Entrances (1943), Appalachian Spring (1944), Dark Meadow (1946), and Errand into the Maze (1947) to explore human and societal complexities. The innovative choreography and visual imagery of American Document (1938) exemplified Graham’s genius. The dramatic narrative, which included the Company’s first male dancer, explored the concept of what it means to be American. Through the representation of important American cultural groups such as Native Americans, African-Americans, and Puritans and the integration of text from historical American documents, Graham was able to capture the soul of the American people.

During her long and illustrious career, Graham created 181 masterpiece dance compositions, which continue to challenge and inspire generations of performers and audiences. In 1986, she was given the Local One Centennial Award for dance by her theater colleagues, awarded only once every 100 years, and during the Bicentennial she was granted the United States’ highest civilian honor, The Medal of Freedom. In 1998, TIME Magazine named her the “Dancer of the Century.” The first dancer to perform at the White House and to act as a cultural ambassador abroad, she captured the spirit of a nation and expanded the boundaries of contemporary dance. “I have spent all my life with dance and being a dancer,” she said. “It’s permitting life to use you in a very intense way. Sometimes it is not pleasant. Sometimes it is fearful. But nevertheless it is inevitable.”


Source: Martha Graham Dance Company

More information: www.marthagraham.org

Glushanok, Peter

Peter Glushanok, a film maker, artist and composer, died on Dec. 5 at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. He was 82 and lived in Manhattan.


Mr. Glushanok had a long career in film as a director, producer and camera man, beginning in the 1940's, before becoming a painter in the 1970's. His films included ''Dancer's World'' and ''Hymn of the Nations,'' documentaries on Martha Graham and Arturo Toscanini. Mr. Glushanok also made films on a wide range of social themes, including ''Freedom of the Press'' and ''Japanese Bride in America,'' both for the Civilian Affairs Division of the United States Army, and ''Angry Boy,'' an award-winning documentary on psychiatric treatment. He also made short films for the Office of War Information in Washington and feature films that included ''Uncle Vanya.''


He was born in Riga, Latvia, and came to the United States in the early 1920's. He served in the Navy during World War II. He taught advanced film directing and lighting at City College and conducted a film workshop at Columbia University. He was an associate professor of film and television at New York University School of the Arts, where he developed courses in film and electronic music. His students there included Martin Scorsese.


He also composed electronic music and won first prize in the Dartmouth International Electronic Music Contest for his score ''In Memoriam for My Friend Henry Sala.''


Source: The New York Times

Martha Graham Dance Company

In 1926, Martha Graham founded her dance company and school, living and working out of a tiny Carnegie Hall studio in midtown Manhattan.

Martha Graham and her Company have expanded contemporary dance’s vocabulary of movement and forever altered the scope of the art form by rooting works in contemporary social, political, psychological, and sexual contexts, deepening their impact and resonance.


Always a fertile ground for experimentation, Martha Graham Dance Company has been an unparalleled resource in nurturing many of the leading choreographers and dancers of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Merce Cunningham, Erick Hawkins, Pearl Lang, Pascal Rioult, and Paul Taylor.


Graham’s repertoire of 181 works has also engaged noted performers such as Mikhail Baryshnikov, Claire Bloom, Margot Fonteyn, Liza Minnelli, Rudolf Nureyev, Maya Plisetskaya, and Kathleen Turner. Her groundbreaking techniques and unmistakable style have earned the Company acclaim from audiences in more than 50 countries throughout North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.


Today, the Company continues to foster Graham’s spirit of ingenuity.


It is embracing a new programming vision that showcases masterpieces by Graham alongside newly commissioned works by contemporary artists inspired by Graham’s legacy. With programs that unite the work of choreographers across time within a rich historical and thematic narrative, the Company is actively working to create new platforms for contemporary dance and multiple points of access for audiences.


Martha Graham Dance Company’s 2019-20 repertory includes new works by Pontus Lidberg, Pam Tanowitz, and Maxine Doyle and Bobbi Jene Smith alongside iconic Graham masterpieces Appalachian Spring, Lamentation, Cave of the Heart, and Chronicle. The Company continues to expand its mission to present the work of its founder and her contemporaries, and remains a leader by catalyzing new works with commissions that bring fresh perspectives to dance classics.


The Martha Graham Dance Company has performed at the Metropolitan Opera, Carnegie Hall, the Paris Opera House, Covent Garden, and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, as well as at the base of the Great Pyramids in Egypt and in the ancient Odeon of Herodes Atticus theatre on the Acropolis in Athens. Have a look at our Performance Calendar to see where we’ll be next.


Source: Martha Graham Dance Company

More information: www.marthagraham.org

Appalachian Spring

Choreography : Martha Graham

Interpretation : Martha Graham (Bride), Stuart Hodes (Husbandman), Bertram Ross (Preacher) Matt Turney (Pioneer Woman), Yuriko, Helen McGehee, Miriam Cole, Ethel Winter (Followers)

Our themas and videos suggestions

Aucun Résultat

By accessing the website, you acknowledge and accept the use of cookies to assist you in your browsing.
You can block these cookies by modifying the security parameters of your browser or by clicking onthis link.
I accept Learn more