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Dances for Children (Around the Linden Tree, Classical Duet, Three Graces, Écossaise, Ballspiel, Water Study) [transmission 2023]

CN D - Centre national de la danse Danse en amateur et répertoire 2023 - Directors : Auger, Ludovic - Simon, Nicolas

Choreographer(s) : Duncan, Isadora (United States)

Present in collection(s): Danse en amateur et répertoire

Video producer : Centre national de la danse

Integral video available at CND de Pantin

en fr

Dances for Children (Around the Linden Tree, Classical Duet, Three Graces, Écossaise, Ballspiel, Water Study) [transmission 2023]

CN D - Centre national de la danse Danse en amateur et répertoire 2023 - Directors : Auger, Ludovic - Simon, Nicolas

Choreographer(s) : Duncan, Isadora (United States)

Present in collection(s): Danse en amateur et répertoire

Video producer : Centre national de la danse

Integral video available at CND de Pantin

en fr

Dances for Children (Around the Linden Tree, Classical Duet, Three Graces, Écossaise, Ballspiel, Water Study) [transmission 2023]

A choreographic extract remodelled by the group Koregrafik, coordinators Pauline Poggi, Valentine Savéan, as part of the “Danse en amateur et repertoire” programme 2022/2023 (a programme created to assist and promote amateur dancing).

Transmission by Barbara Kane, Pierre-Emmanuel Langry. 

Presented on 3 June 2023, Le Triangle, Cité de la danse, in Rennes. 

The piece when it was created  

Dances for Children (Around the Linden Tree, Classical Duet, Three Graces, Écossaise, Ballspiel, Water Study)  

Firstly produced circa 1910 

Choreography: Isadora Duncan 

Music: Franz Schubert (Valses sentimentales, no 18, D.779, op. 50 ; Danses allemandes, n° 10, D.783, op. 33 ; Premières valses, n° 33, D.365, op. 9 ; Écossaise, n° 1, D.734, op. 67 ; Valse de Graz, n° 10, D.924, op. 91 ; Valse de Graz, n° 12, D.924, op. 91)  

Original duration : 9 min  

The group

Founded in 2016 in Triel-sur-Seine, Koregrafik provides its eight members with a space not only for regular training, but also for creative development and exploration, under the direction of dance teacher Pauline Poggi. The troupe has presented two works, entitled Sur le fil and Organik at the Théâtre Octave Mirbeau in Triel-sur-Seine, where choreographers, including Régis Obadia and Abdennour Belalit, have given masterclasses and taught repertoire. This is the first time Koregrafik is participating in the Amateur Dance and Repertoire programme.   

The project 

The troupe has selected Isadora Duncan’s Dances for Children, created circa 1910. Generally taught to children, it is a light-hearted piece, set to Schubert’s waltzes, which showcases the harmonious serenity at the heart of Duncan’s work. Dances for Children is divided into short sequences danced as solos, duos, in fours or as an ensemble. The sequences are structured as a circle from which individual dancers periodically break away without ever truly breaking the continuity of the circle dance. This interplay between the individual and the group through mutual attention attracted the dancers to the piece. Dance notator Pierre-Emmanuel Langry and Duncan expert Barbara Kane taught Dances for Children to the group, based on scores and archives, particularly photographs. 

Duncan, Isadora

Born Isadora Angela Duncan in San Francisco on May 26, 1877, Isadora discovered the joy of dance in nature, amidst the wind, sea and waves at the beach as a young child. Her home provided artistic and intellectual riches – even though her father left the family in financial straits soon after Isadora was born. Isadora’s mother, Mary Dora Gray, was a skilled pianist and teacher, who played Beethoven and Schubert for the children and read Shakespeare, Shelley and Browning to them. Isadora’s brother Raymond was a dramatist, Augustine an actor, and Elizabeth and Isadora danced and taught dance classes from early ages as the family scrambled financially. 


Isadora left San Francisco for Chicago with her mother in 1895 where she danced at the Masonic Temple Roof Garden and auditioned for Augustin Daly’s theatre company. She joined Daly’s company, moving to New York with most of her family. She toured America and went to London with the Daly company. Displeased with what she considered a trivial role of dance in the theatre productions, she quit the company in 1898. Isadora danced in private salons, and first danced at the Music Room in Carnegie Hall, in collaboration with composer Ethelbert Nevin, in a program including Nevin’s Narcissus, Ophelia and Water Nymphs on March 24, 1898. She described her dance as “movement expressive of thought” in her early lectures. 


In May 1899 Isadora and family traveled to London, in search of ways to deepen and broaden her art. Isadora studied the Greek and Roman antiquities at the British Museum. After meeting artist Charles Hallé, she performed for prominent Londoners at his New Gallery, dancing the legend of Orpheus, to music of Gluck. In “The Art of the Dance” Isadora described herself as neither the narrator nor the character of the myths she danced, but the “soul of the music”, a “role reserved by the Greeks for the Chorus.” 


The following year Isadora followed her brother Raymond to Paris, where he sketched and she studied the Louvre’s Greece vase collection. After a tour with Loie Fuller’s company, Isadora was invited to perform her own programme in Budapest, Hungary (1902), where she danced to sold-out performances with full orchestra. Her famous encore was The Blue Danube. Performances followed in Berlin, Vienna and Munich. Many artists were to draw and photograph her including Emile-Antoine Bourdelle, Peter Berger, Robert Henri, August Rodin, Jose Clara, Jules Grandjouan, Valentine Lecomte and Abraham Walkowitz. Her European success allowed for a trip to Greece (1903), time to appreciate the art and ruins, to purchase land, and to perform in front of the Greek royal family, including King George.


In January 1905, Isadora accomplished a long-time goal, as she opened her first school for twenty children in Grunewald, Germany. In true visionary style, the children were given free room, board and instruction in dance, music and literature. They wore tunics and sandals and were surrounded by great artworks indoors and nature outdoors. Among these first students were the six who were adopted in order to enter the United States during World War 1 and would later be dubbed “the Isadorables” by the French press: Anna, Erika, Irma, Lisa, Margot and Marie-Theresa. She was able to establish a second school which she named Dionysian at a mansion in Bellevue, outside of Paris, in 1914, with financial help from Paris Singer. Bellevue was later given to the Red Cross as an army hospital at the start of World War I. Isadora and her students then met in America, where “the Isadorables” debuted at Carnegie Hall, in December 1914. Isadora regularly left her schools to tour and perform in order to sustain the school and to support members of her family, a recurrent theme throughout her life. While away, her sister Elizabeth often acted as school director and teacher. 


Isadora’s legacy as the “Mother of Modern Dance” is seen in the progression of her repertory, from the lyrical dances to classical composers like Chopin, Brahms, Strauss and Schubert (a radical use of classic music at the time), to the dances of Greek myths, archetypes, human emotions and later in her heroic dances of nationalism (La Marseillaise, Rakoczy March). Isadora and Irma traveled to Russia in 1921, at the invitation of the Russian government, where they formed a third school for children. Isadora danced the Revolutionary, and dedicated songs and dances to the Russian workers and for the Russian children. What had started as lyrical, free spirited, barefoot dance, a rejection of the stilted ballet world of her time, deepened with her life experiences, travel, and with the influence of a wide range of artists, poets, composers and intelligentsia in her circle. Although Isadora was drawn to Greek myths and philosophy, she recreated, rather than copied, ancient themes. She defined the solar plexus as the “central spring of all movement” (Duncan, “My Life”). As a performer, she continued to move audiences deeply throughout her career, as evidenced by reviews and personal accounts.


A revolutionary thinker in women’s issues, espousing freedom for body and spirit, Isadora vowed never to marry. From her first long-term relationship with famous British set designer, Edward Gordon Craig, her daughter Deidre was born (September 24, 1906). With Paris Singer, she bore her son Patrick Augustus Duncan (born May 1, 1910). Both children died in a tragic accident on April 19, 1913. Isadora’s devastation is later reflected in her choreography Mother


Although Isadora’s success blossomed in Europe and led to travel to Egypt, South America and Russia, she returned to tour America several times. Many of her Isadora’s programs are shared in Private Collections. Isadora was generally well received in America, until her visit in 1922 with Soviet poet and husband Sergei Esenin, (married to allow him a travel visa), when anti-Soviet feelings ran high in the United States. 


In 1927, Isadora agreed to publish her memoirs “My Life” and finished writing and dictating them to her secretary. Her last performance was at the Mogador Theatre in Paris on July 8. Isadora was accidentally killed in an automobile, near her studio in Nice, on September 14, 1927, at age 50. Her enduring legacy continues to inspire new generations of dancers.


Source : Isadora Duncan’s Archives website


More information : 

http://www.isadoraduncanarchive.org/ 

Auger, Ludovic

Simon, Nicolas

Ses deux frères aînés lui ayant transmis leur passion très jeune, l’un pour l’image, l’autre pour le son, Nicolas Simon devient très vite cinéphile et commence à réaliser des courts- métrages dès l’adolescence. Après une formation aux métiers de l’audiovisuel à l’ESRA Rennes où il réalise deux courts- métrages en 16mn, il rencontre Emmanuelle Vo-Dinh en 2004 et découvre la danse contemporaine. En 2008 il réalise Making Rainbow, qui retrace les cinq mois de création de la première édition du spectacle Rainbow. Il co-réalise ensuite Le Grand Éléphant - L’Aventure des Constructeurs une incursion de près de deux ans dans les locaux de l’association La Machine pour suivre avec ses constructeurs la naissance du Grand Éléphant de l’Île de Nantes. Tout en continuant à travailler de façon régulière avec de nombreux chorégraphes comme Alban Richard, Margot Dorléans, Sylvain Riéjou, Daniel Dobbels ainsi que le Pôle et PJPP, Il réalise en parallèle des documentaires comme Les Constructeurs d’Éole, Je me souviens. 

Dances for Children (Around the Linden Tree, Classical Duet, Three Graces, Écossaise, Ballspiel, Water Study) [transmission 2023]

Choreography : Isadora Duncan

Interpretation : Extrait remonté par le groupe Koregrafik, coordinatrices Pauline Poggi, Valentine Savéan, dans le cadre de Danse en amateur et répertoire (2022/2023)

Video conception : Nicolas Simon et Ludovic Auger

Duration : 14 minutes

Danse en amateur et répertoire

Amateur Dance and Repertory is a companion program to amateur practice beyond the dance class and the technical learning phase. Intended for groups of amateur dancers, it opens a space of sharing for those who wish to deepen a practice and a knowledge of the dance in relation to its history.

Laurent Barré
Head of Research and Choreographic Directories
Anne-Christine Waibel
Research Assistant and Choreographic Directories
+33 (0)1 41 83 43 96
danse-amateur-repertoire@cnd.fr

Source: CN D

More information: https://www.cnd.fr/en/page/323-danse-en-amateur-et-repertoire-grant-programme

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